Search

Filter

Tags

Found 14 results...

ABRSM Exam Resources

The Essential Guide to ABRSM Examinations FREE

This series contains resources and further links to other resources featuring the ABRSM syllabus and is designed for elementary level players, young musicians and their teachers. Some articles in this series will provide a step-by-step (or phrase-by-phrase) approach to learning a piece thoroughly and securely, building a solid foundation for...


ABRSM Exam Resources

Grade 2 C1 - The Piper of Dundee (Worksheet)

The Piper o’Dundee is a traditional Scottish folk song, arranged for the ABRSM Grade 2 syllabus by Richard Michael. Click here to download a printable worksheet for this piece (instructions follow below). Here is the folk song itself, together with the words and a very simple left...


ABRSM Exam Resources

Grade 1 C3 - Oh When the Saints (Worksheet)

Click here for a worksheet that will help you get started with this piece. Let’s begin with the tune by itself. You’ll notice there is an introduction where both hands play the same notes an octave apart (bars1-3). The tune itself starts with the left hand in...


Spread Chords

Examples from the Repertoire (4)

Bach's Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue, BWV 903 We find a clear example of two-directional rolling in Bach’s Chromatic Fantasia and Fugue. In the Fantasia, Bach writes three sections in block chords with the direction arpeggio (bars 27-30, 34-42 and 45-49), leaving it to the performer to decide exactly what to...


Spread Chords

General Suggestions for Spreads in Baroque Music

To summarise the main points in this article, here are a few pointers: The speed of the spread reflects mood, tempo and character. The spread can be evenly paced, or include accelerando/ritardando shapings. Hold onto the notes of the arpeggio after you have played them, except for any...


Spread Chords

Examples from the Repertoire (3)

In bar 39 of Bach’s Prelude in C Minor (Book 1), we may simply spread the chord upwards – many players do it this way. There is time to make a grander statement by rolling it down and then back up again (as I suggested in my...


Spread Chords

Examples from the Repertoire (1)

Bach Italian Concerto, BWV 971 Let’s look at the opening chord of Bach’s Italian Concerto. Some players (harpsichordists and pianists) spread the opening LH chord, others don’t. What does this tell us? That there is no one right answer, and that the option to spread the chord lies with the...


Spread Chords

Introduction FREE

This is the first part of a series on spread chords, kindly commissioned for the Online Academy by Orlando Murrin. Introduction to the series Spread (or rolled, ripped, broken or arpeggiated) chords are simply chords where we play one note after the other, rather than playing all the notes...


Spread Chords

Baroque Conventions of Notating Spread Chords

There were a number of different ways of notating spread chords in use in the Baroque. French composers included arpeggiation signs in their table of ornaments, and were specific about the direction of the spread. Here are the two signs for arpeggiation from D'Anglebert’s (1629-1691) table of ornaments...


Spread Chords

Spreading Chords in the Baroque Period FREE

There seems to be some confusion about managing spreads in Baroque music, probably because the way we read a printed score nowadays is rather different from the way a 17th or 18th century musician would have understood things. From Beethoven onwards, many more of the performance choices were removed from...


Spread Chords

Examples from the Repertoire (2)

The opening of the Sinfonia in the second Partita continues to receive a variety of treatments concerning not only the chords, but also whether there should be consistent double dotting throughout (meaning the printed semiquaver after the crotchet rests is played as a demisemiquaver, to match that in the next...


Anyone Can Improvise!

Understanding Chords, Grand Arpeggios and How to Harmonise FREE

This article provides a more in-depth explanation of the material in the video. However, after watching the video you might light to jump ahead to try some of the examples yourself. If so, then please click here to view the worksheets...


Anyone Can Improvise!

Beginning to Improvise FREE

Feel the beat – and just play the black notes! Here is a four phrase (eight-bar) template to help structure your first improvisation. Your left hand will just be playing open 5th chords on F# and C#, and your right hand will only be...